Tuesday, March 24, 2009

The Woman In White

Andrew Lloyd Webber "The Woman In White"
Wow! Today I finished reading the classic Gothic romance mystery "The Woman In White" by
Wilkie Collins. I've always been a Gothic romance novel fan and also a fan of the classics. This great book combined both.
I also just learned that Andrew Lloyd Webber created The Woman In White musical a few years ago. Below is an excerpt from his website:

"The Woman in White already has a substantial pedigree. The novel was first serialized in a weekly magazine, All Year Round, created by Collins's close friend Charles Dickens. When the final instalment was published in August 1860, it was so popular that queues formed to buy it. Wilkie Collins said of The Woman in White that "The story is the longest and most complicated I have ever tried". Fans of the story included the Prince Consort, Gladstone, Thackeray and Dickens himself.
After the novel was published in book form on 15th August 1860, Woman in White mania gripped the public who clamoured to buy Woman in White bonnets and perfumes and dance the special Woman in White waltz. From that day to this the novel has never been out of print. It is both a Gothic melodrama and a modern psychological thriller, a love story.... "
~From the Original London Production Programme
Yes, as mentioned above, it is a love story and what a love story!! It was a book I could barely put down and recommend it to all those who appreciate classical lit with a Gothic setting.

14 comments:

Pat's Place said...

Sounds like a book to get the next time I go to the library. Thanks for the recommendation.

Barbara said...

Pat- I hope you can find and read it. Let me know if you like it.

Linda said...

Very interesting because in 1861 Emily Dickinson began referring to herself at "The Woman in White." Coincidence? Apparently, she didn't start wearing white until later in life. I just wonder if there's any connection.

Barbara said...

Linda- That's interesting. Could it be that she read this book and identified with "The Woman In White" for some reason?

I wonder if some of my readers may know why Dickinson started referring to herself in that fashion?

Joanne said...

Don't you love reading those "can't put down" books? There's something special about them. Interesting Dickinson connection, but I don't know any background on it.

suZen said...

I just walked through the Serenity Gate - lovely place - and I will return! I seem to remember Emily and the Woman in White connection, tho I don't know why. At this age my monkey mind is brimming with useless (mostly) trivia.

Barbara said...

Joanne- We are looking more closely at Dickinson's later life.

Barbara said...

suZen- Thanks so much for stopping by and please come by often.

Kathryn Magendie said...

What a compelling image that is on the stage! I don't read that genre of books, but it really does sound intriguing!

Becca said...

Sounds like a book worth finding!

Lea and her Mustangs said...

Not the kind of book I read but perhaps I had better look into it. I got a Hemingway book at the used book store. I have not read them for a long time. After touring his home in Key West last March, I have been determined to reread some of them.

Terri Tiffany said...

Very different! isn't it interesting how some books last and last over years?

Heather said...

OOH! I just stumbled here and am so excited! I've not seen a picture from the show, but we're nearly done listening to the book on the podcast CraftLit. I can't wait to share the picture with everyone. And I'm SO glad you liked the book too!

Anonymous said...

I've listened to the soundtrack for "The Woman in White" musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber, pictured above, an it it good. It was touching and the story moving. I would recommend giving it a listen. I didn't know it was book until i stumbled here. I may have to try to find it and read it- I like reading the tales from which the musicals come.